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Obesity in Cats

Obesity in Cats

A large longhair grey color cat laying down and licking lips with paw in an overflowing bowl of food

Overweight cats face serious health risks, lower quality of life and perhaps even a feline form of depression. Fat cats have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, liver disease, diabetes, orthopedic problems and even neurological problems. As our cats' protectors, it is our responsibility to take obesity seriously by feeding and exercising them sensibly.

For cats, twice daily feeding of reasonable amounts of high fiber, low fat cat food is a good approach. Also, treats should be suitably formulated, small and strictly rationed. But even with such measures, some cats still don't lose weight. This is when you should enlist your veterinarian's help to check for medical conditions that may be contributing factors to your cat's obesity. Your veterinarian may also prescribe a specific diet or exercise to help with weight loss. Not only does regular exercise help to burn calories, but it also provides an outlet for pent-up energy that might otherwise transmute into anxious eating behavior.

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Dr. Borns-Weil says...

Dr. Stephanie Borns-Weil, DVM, DACVB

Dr. Borns-Weil, DVM, DACVB

Board-Certified Animal Behaviorist

As our cats' protectors, it is our responsibility to take obesity seriously by feeding and exercising them sensibly.